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Only 36% of Tweets on Twitter Worth Reading via Marketing Charts

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Only 36% of Tweets on Twitter Worth Reading via Marketing Charts

  
  
  
  

This report about Twitter released by Carnegie Mellon University says they don't care about how you are feeling or what mood you are in.  Sending messages via Twitter that are boring will give Twitter a bad reputation.  Define "boring" if you can.

Twitter Users Say Only 36% of Tweets Worth Reading

cmu-tweet-attitudes.jpgTwitter users rated only 36% of the tweets they received as worth reading, while they expressed ambivalence about 39% and said 25% were not worth reading, according to [pdf] research released in January 2012 by Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), which looked at data gleaned from December 2010 to January 2011. “Question to followers” tweets were the least disliked of the various categories studied, with an 18% probability of being rated not worth reading.  Read full article here on marketingcharts.com.

You will read about statistics that may help you understand a bit more about this social media tool.


Can your business be successful without using Twitter? 

Yes. 

There are many ways to connect with buyers and potential buyers.  Search engines are sensitve to social media and Twitter has become a new method of participating with websites vs. the old days where people would make comments on a blog has been replaced by a tweet, a like or a "+".


Should you add "Please Retweet" to your tweets?



Looking at data can easily have you doubting yourself, possibliy to the point of giving up.  If you tweet a few times a day, taking a glance at these charts and making small adjustments will do you fine.  You are, after all, using Twitter as a tool to share something interesting with someone.  If you turn on the "automatic tweets" and become a broadcaster, it will be ignored just as all other advertising noise.




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