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Twitter Business News: Bit.ly going away and here comes t.co

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Twitter Business News: Bit.ly going away and here comes t.co

  
  
  
  

twitter for businessTwitter Readies Its Own URL Shortener, t.co

To fight off mallware and provide analytics data

Twitter has made an expected announcement:  it will be introducing its own URL-shortening service.  What’s more, the new service will be used all the time, regardless of whether a link is already shortened with a third-party service. Twitter’s URL shortener will use the t.co domain and will eventually be rolled out to everyone this summer.

“Since early March, we have been routing links within Direct Messages through our link service to detect, intercept, and prevent the spread of malware, phishing, and other dangers,” Twitter’s Sean Garrett wrote in a blog-post announcement.

“Links reported to us as malicious are blacklisted, and we present users with a page that warns them of potentially malicious content if they click blacklisted links. We want users to have this benefit on all tweets,” he said.

“[W]e're taking small steps to expand the link service currently available in Direct Messages to links shared through all Tweets. We're testing this link service now with a few Twitter employee accounts,” he announced.

OK.  You get the idea.  If you want to read more,  Go to Softpedia here.

No? Then let's get down to business.  

If the url shortener you are using will be shortened by the Twitter shortener, what will we call a twice shortened url?

This is just a heads up.  Keep an eye out so you have a plan.  If you are tracking information with a shortener now, get ready for a change.

If you don't know what a url shortenr is or how it is used, watch this.


 




Comments

I think Twitter may be making a big mistake here. In effect, they're becoming like everyone else - a dangerous strategy at the best of times. 
 
By automatically shortening URLs, they are removing the one hint the readers will have about where the link will take you. In essence, it cloaks its origins; and any loss of transparency risks losing the truth as well. 
 
My guess is that the majority of people don't know this change is coming, and so when it does it will create a lot of suspicion in the Twitter world. Then, like most other things, when folks realize there's nothing they can do about it, short of discontinuing its use, they'll just accept it. But, what a price to pay! 
 
Bruce Hoag, PhD, CPsychol 
Work Psychologist 
http://www.p-advantage.com
Posted @ Thursday, June 10, 2010 1:09 AM by Bruce Hoag, PhD, CPsychol
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